Community Kauhale ‘Ōiwi: 2-5 September 2016
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 The Community Kauhale ‘Ōiwi is a peer-to-peer meeting space at IUCN WCC that provides an opportunity for local and indigenous leaders to exchange knowledge and best practices in sustainable environmental management. Leveraging the unique partnerships of the Equator Initiative, the Kauhale aims to position local advocacy and knowledge sharing within the larger policy dialogues on conservation and sustainable development. To see an overview of Community Kauhale ‘Ōiwi events at WCC, please click here. 

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Kauhale Ōiwi Homepage Day 1: 2 September Day 2: 3 September
Day 3: 4 September Day 4: 5 September

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Welcome & Opening of the Kauhale ‘Ōiwi Localizing the SDGs: Engaging Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities Book Launch and Reception for The power of maps: Bringing the third dimension to the negotiation table

The official opening of the Equator Initiative Commuity Kauhale ‘Ōiwi, will include a traditional Hawaiian opening ceremony, and key remarks by IUCN and UNDP senior staff, in addition to Equator Initiative partners. To read more, click here. 

This roundtable will explore how the global sustainable development goals (SDGs) can be implemented to address local realities and needs. Local governments and stakeholders including indigenous peoples and local communities will play a critical role in defining, delivering and monitoring the 2030 development agenda. With a wide range of speakers from the UN, civil society, and non-profits, this roundtable addresses the questions:

  • How will governments and development agencies work with local actors to ensure ‘no one is left behind’?
  • What needs to take place at the national level to evaluate how the SDGs can be localized?

To read more, click here. 

This session will see the launch of a collection of 12 impact stories about participatory 3-dimensional modelling (P3DM) – an innovative process that maps traditional knowledge as physical three-dimensional models. P3DM enables marginalised communities to present their territory – together with their own valuable knowledge – in a physical and visual form, offering an opportunity to monitor precious resources against outside threats and preserve them for future generations.  

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 ICCAs and Protected Areas: Governance, Best Practice and Network Building   The Value of Community-to-Community Exchange: Strengthening Networks Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Conservation Activities and the Fulfilment of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

This session will provide an overview of Indigenous Peoples and Community Conserved Territories and Areas (ICCAs) and Protected Areas (PAs). Speakers will share examples of ICCAs and PAs to identify best practices, discuss the threats and challenges to ICCAs, and evaluate relationships among diverse ICCAs and mainstream conservation efforts. The session seeks to expand and strengthen networks among indigenous peoples and local communities that are managing ICCAs and Protected Areas. To read more, click here.

This session will highlight the importance of community-to-community exchange to enhance local learning, scale up work, and build networks. Speakers will discuss how and why different networks for community-to-community exchange have developed, the challenges they have faced, and the components that are needed to ensure their growth and relevance in a digital age. The session will share the outcomes of the International Network of Mountain Indigenous Peoples (INMIP) and Biodiversity and Community Health (BaCH) as well as experiences from the ICCA Consortium and the WIN peer-to-peer exchange network. To read more, clickhere.

The UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, will share the findings from her report about impact of conservation activities on the rights of indigenous peoples. In response, a panel of representatives from indigenous peoples groups, conservation organizations, and government will share their views on the findings of the report. The session will conclude with an open dialogue among workshop participants and panelists exploring how conservation activities can be strenthened by the inclusion of indigenous peoples. To read more, click here.

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Book Launch and Reception for Climate Solutions from Community Forests: Learning from Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities Accessing Global Finances: Funding Opportunities for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities Local-Global Leaders Dialogue

This event is an official book launch for the publication, Climate Solutions from Community Forests: Learning from Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities. The book features case studies on 22 community-based forest management initiatives, each a recipient of the prestigious Equator Prize. Organized around four themes – sustainable forest livelihoods, forest-friendly agriculture, forest restoration, and forest protection – the book draws from case material to illustrate how critical indigenous peoples and community-managed forests are to the achievement of global climate and sustainable development goals. The launch event will include a roundtable discussion with representatives from several of the forest initiatives featured in the book, as well as a presentation of key lessons learned from the case studies. To read more, click here.

This roundtable discussion will bring together representatives from key global funding modalities. The Global Environment Facility (GEF), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF), and the Dedicated Grant Mechanism for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (DGM) will provide an overview of what funding modalities are available to indigenous peoples and local communities. Representatives from foundations such as the Global Greengrants Fund (GGF), Samdhana Institute, Swift Foundation, and Christensen Fund will also participate.  The roundtable will showcase financing options available to indigenous peoples and local communities as well as enable participants to provide feedback to financing institutions on how opportunities can be expanded to better target local needs. To read more, click here

In partnership with IUCN, UNDP will host a Local-Global Leaders Dialogue that focuses on harnessing the power of local action to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The dialogue will be oriented around three priority themes:

  • Securing and expanding rights to communal lands, territories and natural resources
  • Ensuring adequate finance and investment in indigenous peoples organizations and community-based action
  • Creating political, legal and institutional space for indigenous peoples and local communities to contribute to policymaking and planning on SDG implementation.

The event will engage leading indigenous peoples and local community organizations in dialogue with national and international policymakers. To read more, click here

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WCC flower trifold Kauhale Logo
Protection-Production Partnerships for Forests, Climate and Sustainable Development Building Partnerships: Sharing Stories Digital Technology:
Opportunities and Challenges to Documenting Traditional Knowledge

This event will explore how 'protection-production partnerships' aim to strengthen multi-stakeholder actions to develop resilient supply chains while curtailing forest loss. Discussion will focus on the concept, state of play, and how action in this arena is showing mutual beneficial outcomes for forest conservation and community development objectives. To read more, click here

The Equator Initiative and IUCN’s Commission in Ecosystem Management (CEM) share a common priority of promoting livelihood security and human well-being. We invite you to join us for an informal social to help us get to know each other; to share our stories; to explore opportunities to work together; and to help each other achieve common goals. The evening will provide the opportunity for members of the Equator Initiative and CEM communities to share stories highlighting our common work and to develop future initiatives. To read more, click here

This is a fourth in a series of dialogues on the ethical use of digital technology to document traditional knowledge. The session will focus on the advantages of using newly available digital tools such as drones, smart phones, and GIS to map and protect indigenous territories from illegal activities. It will also look at the threats that accompany the use of these technologies in the wrong hands. Issues of access, use, ownership, consent and intellectual property rights are at the center of this debate. To read more, click here. 

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 Media Training: How to Tell your Story  Changing Social Behavior: Developing a Successful Campaign  Protecting Our Wildlife: Closing Reception of the Community Kauhale ʻŌiwi

This session will provide a media training on how to use communications tools effectively to mobilize for change. Co-led by PCI Media Impact and the Hawaii Institute for Human Rights, the session will focus on what methodologies to use to tell a compelling story, the impact it can have, and how to attract media attention. The session will incorporate a practical role play exercise for participants to engage in a mock press conference. Local media will attend. To read more, click here. 

This workshop will focus on how to develop a successful advocacy campaign, using the examples of the NGO Rare’s Pride campaigns, and the IUCN’s #NatureForAll. The workshop addresses questions such as: 

  • How do you change social behavior at the community level to promote conservation of natural resources? 
  • What key components are needed to make that happen?

This hands-on workshop using interactive methodologies will showcase campaigns that have worked and will introduce participants to new global movements such as #NatureForAll and #LandRightsNow. To read more, click here. 

The closing session will consist of two parts. The session will start with a panel discussion addressing the importance of protecting the world’s wildlife through: i) the direct involvement and leadership of communities, ii) strengthening partnerships with government, the UN, community based networks, and others, and iii) the need for commitments like the SDGs to frame interventions and actions. Examples from communities and the scientific community will be shared. The second part will include the official closing of the Community Kauhale ʻŌiwi with remarks from the Equator Initiative, a community statement from the Equator Prize winners and a reception. To read more, click here

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